Time May Not Be the Problem

How We Use Time To Avoid the Truth of What We Value

The question of Time continually rears it’s head. I did two episodes of Creative Minds on Time this season and I know it’s only a scratch or two on a very rough exterior. Time is an obstacle for us all. How do we find enough? How do we manage what we have? Why does it go so fast? But Time isn’t always the issue. The real question is not how do we arrange our time, but rather what do we value?

Do you watch four hours of TV and then tell yourself that you don’t have the time to read? Do you continually flip through Facebook instead of mediating? We all do it. We all value things we tell ourselves that we shouldn’t. It’s a frightening reality.

Time can remain an issue for many of us because facing these truths can be very difficult and uncomfortable. We avoid them because they require us to ask further questions of ourselves.

Most of us know what we “should” be doing, we know that we could manage our time better, and we often know exactly where we are wasting it. But the question we are avoiding is Why? Why do I value Bloons Tower Defense more than my novel?

Because my novel is difficult; because it makes me feel like I’m continually failing; because winning a stupid level on a game feels better; because it’s fun and right now my life is sorely devoid of fun.

Underneath the question of Time is always another question, one without an easy answer that frees us from responsiblity like “There just aren’t enough hours in the day.” Look there. Dare to look there. What’s underneath your problem with time?

Chad Hall